Does Coinstar have any competition

Etymologie, Etimología, Etymologie, Etimologia, Etymology
US United States of America, Estados Unidos de América, États-Unis d'Amérique, Stati Uniti d'America, United States of America
Comic, Cómic, Bande dessinée (B.D.), Fumetto, Comic strip

A.

B.

BCDB
Big cartoon data base

"BCDB" stands for "Big Cartoon DataBase".

(E?) (L1) http://www.bcdb.com/
Reference book with cartoons with 100,000 cartoons.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.bcdb.com/bcdb/page.cgi?p=About

This project started because we were bored. And, we wanted an easy way to look up information about cartoons, a dedicated cartoon filmography and in depth episode guide. While IMdb is very good for movies, and has some cartoon information, it did not seem to us to be enough. So, we decided to make something that did suit our needs, The Big Cartoon DataBase (and lots of long nights) ensued.

First and foremost, this is a labor of love. No one gets paid a dime for doing this filmography - in fact, we loose money monthly just running the darn thing. But it is something we enjoy, and so we will keep doing it, updating and adding every chance we get. While the project started as a couple of guys in Salt Lake City with too much time on their hands, we are very indebted to those others - who, like us, love cartoons - and have given freely of their time, hard work and research to help make The Big Cartoon DataBase what it is today.
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G

Gammus diptherocus (W3)

(E?) (L?) Http://www.quakpiep.de/Barks.html
I don't know whether the species name "Gammus diptherocus" has any equivalent in the real science of racing fleas. In Duckburg this species belongs to the family "Curropulexidae" = "racing fleas". The term "Gammus diptherocus" could possibly be translated as "two-winged one jumping back and forth" ("gampen" = "hopping", "jumping" and "diptera" = "two-winged winged"). - If it weren't for the statement: "Wings or their approaches are not there." - ???


"Arrow-nosed earth flea", "Gammus diptherocus"
Barks, 1958
The arrow-nosed flea is an insect-like creature of microscopic size. Almost nothing is known about the area of ​​distribution and way of life. What is certain, however, is that the arrow-nosed earth flea is a very fast runner. This fact is often used to organize "insect races" against inferior opponents. Although its morphological structure is clearly visible, it is difficult to interpret because the deviations from the generally rather rigid structure of the insects are considerable. The easily delimited head bears an arrow that ends in a forward-facing barb, which is externally inseparable from the rest of the head. so it is probably not a mouthpiece in the actual (insect) sense. These can be found in the form of tooth-like structures in the upper part of the mouth. The "tongue" is to be understood as a rudiment of the lower chewing tools. Antennas are missing, instead seven elongated skin flaps sit on the head. The back of the head looks fur. The two eyes appear to be lens eyes. The chest part is completely atypical for insects, but it is easy to distinguish. Behind the head there is a segment that is unfurled and darkly colored downwards. There are five segments that can only be defined on the back. Six legs are diffusely distributed on this body section, have no structure and end in four claws at the bottom.
Wings or their approaches are not available. It could be a purely external doubling of the segments (six constrictions in three segments, which would correspond to the three pairs of legs), as is known from some annelid worms, for example. However, this hypothesis is uncertain because such a process has not yet been proven in arthropods (this would also catapult the flea out of the insect family tree). The abdomen of the earth flea is stubby and unsegmented, but provided with skin flaps similar to the head.
The fact that certain insect characteristics (such as the threefold structure of the body with six legs that arise from the chest) are present allows the earth flea to be postulated as a transition form between millipedes and primitive insects, characterized by numerous special characteristics. The arrow-nosed earth flea, like its relatives, probably belongs to the spiny-skinned leaf bug (Buggus ostecrockus) and the gruesome polyfoot; (s.d.), a group of animals that is still completely unknown in our world.

The earth flea is therefore very old in phylogenetic terms.


Gasoline Alley (W3)

Frank King's "Gasoline Alley" comic series began in a supplement to the Chicago Tribune. The main characters "Walt, Doc, Avery and Bill" met there to talk about their cars - a topic that interested everyone at the time. The name "Gasoline Alley" refers to it.

A special feature of this comic series was that the characters aged as well as the readers.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/faculty/culture/persons/team/Kelleter/publications/great_mad_new.pdf

Stephan Ditschke, Katerina Kroucheva, Daniel Stein (eds.)

Comics - On the history and theory of a popular cultural medium
...
On the other hand, Outcault's Strip motivates a number of new kid strips that are vying for the attention of urban readership in the wake of the Yellow Kid. The best-known of these series is Rudolph Dirks ’" Katzenjammer Kids ", which the German immigrant drew freely from Wilhelm Busch's Max and Moritz from December 1897 for Hearst's New York Journal. German immigrants are the central figures, which can be recognized by the strange mixture of English and German: “You stay outside with the machine Chames, until you've got done with the supper!” Or “A place with such a humbug, eat not for ladies and chentlemen! «in» My! But the Katzenjammers Are Rich! «.
...
With the "Yellow Kid" and the "Katzenjammer Kids", comic children's characters as protagonists of the comic strips become the norm; the kid strip quickly became the most popular genre in the new medium. Further genres are the so-called family strips, e.g. George McManus' "Bringing Up Father" (1913) and Frank King's "Gasoline Alley" (1918) as well as the later adventure and detective strips, e.g. Harold R. Foster's "Tarzan" (1928/1931 ) and Chester Gould's "Dick Tracy" (1931). The narration in sequential panels, which at Outcault never completely replaced the full-page representation of comical situations, finally becomes a narrative convention with the "Katzenjammer Kids". With Frederick Burr Opper's "Happy Hooligan" (1900), so the consensus in comic research, all three main features of newspaper comics are fully established: serial narration in panels, the display of dialogues in the form of speech bubbles and the serial presence of one charismatic main character.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.gocomics.com/gasolinealley/2015/07/03


(E?) (L?) Http://www.gocomics.com/gasolinealley/2016/05/11

Examples of the strip.


(E?) (L?) Http://www.nndb.com/people/406/000062220/

Frank King (09-Apr-1883 - 24-Jun-1969), cartoonist, "Gasoline Alley"


(E?) (L?) Http://www.oedilf.com/db/Lim.php?Word=Gasoline Alley

Limericks on "Gasoline Alley"


(E?) (L?) Http://www.toonopedia.com/gasalley.htm

Gasoline Alley
...
The Chicago Tribune ran a page on Sundays, called "The Rectangle", that was divided into little boxes where its staff artists would contribute cartoons. Some used ongoing themes; others didn't. Features such as "Pet Peeves", "Science Facts" and "It Isn't the Cost, It's the Upkeep" came and went.

Frank King ... used a small corner of "The Rectangle" for an ongoing cast of characters - Walt, Doc, Avery and Bill - who would get together for a single weekly panel to talk about their cars. He called the continuing series "Gasoline Alley".
...
On Feb. 14, 1921, Walt found the necessary baby abandoned on his doorstep. That was the day Gasoline Alley entered history as the first comic strip in which the characters aged normally. (Hairbreadth Harry had grown up in his strip, but stopped aging in his early 20s.) The baby, named Skeezix (cowboy slang for a motherless calf), grew up, fought in World War II, and is now a retired grandfather. Walt married after all, and had more children, who had children of their own, etc. More characters entered the storyline on the periphery, and some grew to occupy center stage.
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(E?) (L?) Http://www.transcript-verlag.de/media/pdf/8ac8bc2ef7911482570158806893ce25.pdf

The fall of time. - To a space and a text box in Frank King's Gasoline Alley - ANDREAS PLATTHAUS - 119
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Andreas Platthaus devotes his attention to a phenomenon through which the comic strip offers readers of American daily and weekend newspapers a permanent area of ​​identification: storytelling in ›real time‹. In his analysis of Frank King's long-lived "Gasoline Alley", Platthaus describes how the time got into comics, i.e. how and why King's decision to age his characters with readers revolutionized the genre of newspaper comics. What King achieved through this trick was achieved with the superhero comics through the creation of fictional universes that function as mythological systems, as Stephan Ditschke and Anjin Anhut explain. The characters of American superhero universes, e.g. the publishers Marvel and DC Comics, function as quasi-mythical powers as legitimizing authorities in current debates about values ​​and norms in American society, which are made available in the comic booklets.



(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Gasoline Alley
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Gasoline Alley" appears in the literature around 1918.

(E?) (L?) Http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordmap.co/#Gasoline Alley

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Created: 2016-05

H

Hans and Fritz (W3)

The "Katzenjammer Kids" "Hans and Fritz" by Rudolph Dirks do not go back linguistically but ideally in part to the brothers "Max and Moritz" by Wilhelm Busch.

Incidentally, "Hans and Fritz" are translated in French as "Pam et Poum", in Danish. "Knold og Tot", Italian "Bibì e Bibò", ​​Norwegian "Knoll og Tott".


...
Rudolph Dirks created "The Katzenjammer Kids" in 1897 for the American Humorist, the famed Sunday supplement of the New York Journal. Inspired in part by "Max Und Moritz", the famous German children's stories of the 1860s, "The Katzenjammer Kids" featured the adventures of "Hans and Fritz", twins and fellow warriors in the battle against any form of authority. "The Katzies" rebelled against Mama (their own mother, of course), the Captain (the shipwrecked sailor who acted as their surrogate father) and the Inspector (dreaded representative of the school authorities).
...


(E?) (L?) Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Katzenjammer_Kids

...
After a series of legal battles between 1912 and 1914, Dirks left the Hearst organization and began a new strip, first titled "Hans and Fritz" and then "The Captain and the Kids". It featured the same characters seen in "The Katzenjammer Kids", which was continued by Knerr. The two separate versions of the strip competed with each other until 1979, when The "Captain and the Kids" ended its six-decade run. "The Katzenjammer Kids" is still distributed by King Features, making it the oldest comic strip still in syndication and the longest running ever.
...


(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Hans and Fritz
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Hans and Fritz" appears in literature around 1850.

(E?) (L?) Http://corpora.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/


(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordmap.co/#Hans and Fritz

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Created: 2016-04

I.

J

K

katzenjammer (W3)

Engl. "Katzenjammer" = Engl. "uproar", "racket", "ruckus", "commotion", "hangover", "distress", "a discordant clamor", also engl. "Loud confused noise from many sources" was brought to the USA by German immigrants and was particularly popular there through the "Katzenjammer Kids". Rudolph Dirks wrote the comic series for the "New York Journal" since 1897. The word "Katzenjammer" is of course made up of German "Katzen" = Engl. "cats" and dt. "Jammer" = engl. "misery", "wretchedness", "wailing", "distress", "lamentation", and originally refers to the rumbling of cats - especially during the mating season. In English, by the way, German "Jammer" survived as English "yammer".

However, there are also a few references to the German "Katzenjammer" as German "Kotzenjammer", which characterized the aftereffects of busy nights.

Literature:
  • Klenz, Heinrich: Katzenjammer. In: Journal for German Word Research 1, 1900/01, 76 f. [Germ. 1 f / 190]
  • Kluge, Friedrich: hangover = pity. In: Journal for German Word Research 5, 1903/04, 262.
  • Kluge, Friedrich (1912): Hangovers and Katzenjammer. In: Ders., Word research and word history. Essays on the German vocabulary. Leipzig, 100-102. Also in: Library on the historical German language for students and schoolchildren. Vol. 6. [Germ. 1 d / 69 l]


(E?) (L?) Http://www.alphadictionary.com/goodword/date/2012/01

01/20/2012 katzenjammer


(E?) (L1) http://www.aphorismen.de/suche?f_thema=Katzenjammer

Bad luck


(E2) (L1) https://www.dictionary.com/browse/katzenjammer

katzenjammer


(E?) (L?) Http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=katzenjammer

"katzenjammer" (n.) 1821, in a German context, "a hangover", American English colloquial, from German "Katzenjammer" "hangover" (18c.), also figuratively, in colloquial use, "remorse of conscience", " vow to mend one's ways ", literally" wailing of cats "," misery of cats ", from" katzen ", comb. form of "katze" "cat" (see "cat" (n.)) + "jammer" "distress", "wailing" (see "yammer" (v.)).
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(E?) (L?) Http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=M

Mouse Hunting and Killing (USA 1966)


(E?) (L?) Http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-February/subject.html

  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day James A. Landau
  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day to say
  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day Wilson Gray



(E?) (L?) Http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2007-January/subject.html

  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day Cohen, Gerald Leonard
  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day to say
  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day Chris F Waigl
  • FW: katzenjammer: M-W's Word of the Day Amy West



(E?) (L?) Https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Katzenjammer

2013 Mar 17 katzenjammer


(E3) (L1) http://www.redensarten-index.de/register/k.php

Bad luck


(E?) (L?) Http://etymologie.tantalosz.de/

After a night of drinking we have "piss off" when we struggle with nausea, loss of appetite and headaches. The original "puke" complaint was probably a bit too coarse, so that the animal comparison with the piercing meow of a cat in heat literally imposes itself. The Latin "crapula" (drunkenness, intoxication) with the metaphorical name once described the poet Felix Schlögl (1821-92) in "Ash Wednesday" as follows: "Today the sweet intoxication is gone; the misery has remained.

The hangover! There are different stages of this state and there are also two kinds of it. The physical misery, so to speak, is soon to be cured. In the people's pharmacy, the use of the ›hair on‹ is a popular and usually unmistakable means for this. This hair-laying now varies again in the nuances of the acid used and depends on the habitual taste, the level of education and the financial resources of the patient concerned. " : "... Medical internally in small gifts (6-10 drops) in ½ glass of water against drunkenness and cat complaints ..."


(E?) (L?) Http://www.textlog.de/tucholsky-rausch-suff.html

Kurt Tucholsky: "Intoxication, drunkenness and shame"


(E?) (L?) Http://www.kruenitz1.uni-trier.de/cgi-bin/callKruenitz.tcl

Student words

Katzenjammer, getting rid of the excess of drinks and food after a swarmed night, even while cheering


(E?) (L2) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_words_of_German_origin

Bad luck


(E?) (L?) Http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liste_deutscher_Redewendung
Having a hangover - feeling miserable, usually after a bad night of drinking followed by a "hangover". The “hangover breakfast” that often follows is supposed to make the headache go away.

(E?) (L?) Http://woerterbuchnetz.de/DWB/

katzenjammer, m. | pathetic adj. | cats whining


(E?) (L?) Http://www.woerterbuchnetz.de/Wander

Wander, Karl Friedrich Wilhelm - German Proverbs Lexicon

Bad luck


(E?) (L?) Http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/Archives/2002-11-Nov.htm

"katzenjammer" - "a hangover" (also, "a discordant clamor") from "Katzen" = "cats" + "Jammer" = "distress", "wailing"
...


(E1) (L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/words/katzenjammer.html

katzenjammer


(E1) (L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/weirdwords/ww-kat1.htm

Bad luck


(E?) (L?) Https://www.yourdictionary.com/katzenjammer

katzenjammer


(E?) (L?) Http://www.zeit.de/2004/38/Stimmts_Tierklau

Bad luck

Animal welfare associations and private individuals regularly draw attention to the fact that professional animal catchers are once again catching cats and dogs running freely on behalf of test laboratories or fur factories. Modern horror fairy tale or reality? Christian Wetzel, Erlangen

A column by Christoph Drösser

September 9, 2004 / Source: (c) DIE ZEIT 09.09.2004 No. 38
...


(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=katzenjammer
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Katzenjammer" appears in the literature around the year 1850/1870.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordmap.co/#katzenjammer

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Created: 2016-04

Katzenjammer Kids (W3)

In the classic comic book, "The Katzenjammer Kids" by Rudolph Dirks speak English with a coarse German accent. The "Katzenjammer Kids" had their first appearance on December 12, 1897 in the Sunday supplement of the "New York Journal". Today it is the longest surviving comic series, and you can still find it in the weekend supplements of American newspapers.

The "Katzenjammer Kids" "Hans and Fritz" by Rudolph Dirks do not go back linguistically but ideally in part to the brothers "Max and Moritz" by Wilhelm Busch. Its creator, Rudolph Dirks of German descent, is considered the legitimate successor of Wilhelm Busch in America. The "Katzenjammer Kids" have therefore already been referred to as "Max and Moritz in New York". And even before their 100th birthday, the US Post dedicated a stamp to the "Katzenjammer Kids" in 1995.

The term "The Katzenjammer Kids" relates to the concept of the individual stories: As with the role models "Max and Moritz", the "Katzenjammer Kids" always got a beating at the end of the story - the "Katzenjammer" was the program.


...
The success of the Katzenjammer Kids is likely to have exceeded even Hearst's high expectations. The "Katzis" became the most popular series within the supplement. And even if they were often plagiarized and inspired countless, equally successful comic series in the competition, the success did not want to end: Even 15 years after their creation, the readers of the rascal duo never got tired. Of course, this did not apply to the same extent to its creator. Dirks, who increasingly wanted to be taken seriously as a painter, was planning a one-year trip to Europe to give him new inspiration. When Hearst then demanded an annual production in advance, it came to a break. The media tsar quickly hired another illustrator who continued the series. Dirks, for his part, sued Hearst for copyright infringement. The inevitable process for the rights to the series ended with a remarkable verdict: Hearst was allowed to continue his series, but Dirks also retained the rights to the characters: And so there were the Katzenjammer Kids twice: Dirks, who now worked for rival Pulitzer , called his series "Hans and Fritz". Hearst, however, continued to publish "The Original Katzenjammer Kids". That didn’t affect the success. Both series enjoyed great popularity. "Hans and Fritz" survived until 1978. The offshoot "The Original Katzenjammer Kids", on the other hand, is still running today, making it the oldest comic strip that is still running.

Only Dirks himself was lost; in the end his health didn't play along either. He gave his part of the series to his assistant Oscar Hitt in the 1940s. From 1946 Dirk's son sat at the drawing board. Joseph Dirks himself died very old in 1968 in his New York apartment. In America he is still unforgettable as one of the great comic pioneers. In his old homeland, however, he was completely ignored until recently. After all, the district town of Heide remembered its famous son and named a street after him. Research has also become increasingly aware of Dirk's pioneering importance: the Braunschweig University of Fine Arts managed to secure parts of the estate. And maybe there will be an exhibition on this remarkable chapter of German-American cultural history in the near future. Then a wider public could finally find out how "Max and Moritz" came to New York and how the beautiful German word Katzenjammer became at home in English.



...
Rudolph Dirks created "The Katzenjammer Kids" in 1897 for the American Humorist, the famed Sunday supplement of the New York Journal. Inspired in part by "Max Und Moritz", the famous German children's stories of the 1860s, "The Katzenjammer Kids" featured the adventures of "Hans and Fritz", twins and fellow warriors in the battle against any form of authority. "The Katzies" rebelled against Mama (their own mother, of course), the Captain (the shipwrecked sailor who acted as their surrogate father) and the Inspector (dreaded representative of the school authorities).
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.berliner-zeitung.de/die-geburt-des-modernen-comics-aus-dem-zeitungskrieg---mit-dem--yellow-kid--erfindet- the-cartoonist-richard-f-outcault-1896-a-new-genre-a-yellow-boy-conquers-new-york-14617580

The birth of modern comics from the newspaper war - with the "Yellow Kid" the cartoonist Richard F. Outcault invented a new genre in 1896. A yellow boy conquered New York
...
"Something like the Yellow Kid" - this new form of visual entertainment presented in series - now all tabloids want to have, preferably even more colorful and fun, and a lot more of it. Hearst again had the most successful idea: he commissioned the German-born draftsman Rudolphe Dirks to develop a series based on Wilhelm Busch's "Max and Moritz". The first episode of "Katzenjammer-Kids" appears in the Sunday Journal on December 12, 1897: They are about two underage bullys who do brutal mischief; Both wear wooden bottoms, one is gaunt, the other round. But as unmistakably Dirks copied his motifs from "Max and Moritz" - so clear are the differences between the old German rascals and their new American successors. In Busch's picture stories, pictures are lined up and provided with written text. But the two kinds of signs always remain separate from one another. In American comics, on the other hand, the writing moves permanently into the picture: In comment texts, speech bubbles and sound words, the written language becomes part of the graphic representation; conversely, the individual comic scenes - the "panels" - now appear like building blocks in a picture text.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.br-online.de/podcast/mp3-download/bayern2/mp3-download-podcast-kalenderblatt.shtml

First pranks of the "Katzenjammer Kids" - 12.12.2014

Max and Moritz were the role models for the New York "Katzenjammer Kids". On December 12, 1897, the first episode of the comic series by the German-born draftsman Rudolph Dirks was published. Author: Anja Mösing

Play audio | Download audio | [Audio] information


(E?) (L?) Https://www.dictionary.com/wordoftheday/2011/01/07/katzenjammer

Friday, January 07, 2011

"katzenjammer", noun [KAT-suhn-jam-er]

The discomfort and illness experienced as the aftereffects of excessive drinking; hangover.

Definitions for katzenjammer
  • 1. The discomfort and illness experienced as the aftereffects of excessive drinking; hangover.
  • 2. Uneasiness; anguish; distress.
  • 3. Uproar; clamor.


Citations for katzenjammer
...
Origin of "katzenjammer"

"Katzenjammer" stems from American English, a combination of the German "Katzen", "cat", and "jammer", "distress". The word was popularized by the early comic "The Katzenjammer Kids".


(E?) (L?) Http://www.jfki.fu-berlin.de/faculty/culture/persons/team/Kelleter/publications/great_mad_new.pdf

Stephan Ditschke, Katerina Kroucheva, Daniel Stein (eds.)

Comics - On the history and theory of a popular cultural medium
...
On the other hand, Outcault's Strip motivates a number of new kid strips that are vying for the attention of urban readership in the wake of the Yellow Kid. The best-known of these series is Rudolph Dirks ’" Katzenjammer Kids ", which the German immigrant drew freely from Wilhelm Busch's Max and Moritz from December 1897 for Hearst's New York Journal. German immigrants are the central figures, which can be recognized by the strange mixture of English and German: “You stay outside with the machine Chames, until you've got done with the supper!” Or “A place with such a humbug, eat not for ladies and chentlemen! «in» My! But the Katzenjammers Are Rich! «.
...
With the "Yellow Kid" and the "Katzenjammer Kids", comic children's characters as protagonists of the comic strips become the norm; the kid strip quickly became the most popular genre in the new medium. Further genres are the so-called family strips, e.g. George McManus' "Bringing Up Father" (1913) and Frank King's "Gasoline Alley" (1918) as well as the later adventure and detective strips, e.g. Harold R. Foster's "Tarzan" (1928/1931 ) and Chester Gould's "Dick Tracy" (1931). The narration in sequential panels, which at Outcault never completely replaced the full-page representation of comical situations, finally becomes a narrative convention with the "Katzenjammer Kids". With Frederick Burr Opper's "Happy Hooligan" (1900), so the consensus in comic research, all three main features of newspaper comics are fully established: serial narration in panels, the display of dialogues in the form of speech bubbles and the serial presence of one charismatic main character.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.ib.hu-berlin.de/~wumsta/infopub/textbook/umfeld/rehm8.html

On December 12th, 1897 the "New York Journal" published the comic series "The Katzenjammer kids" based on "Max und Moritz" (1865) by Wilhelm Busch, which was made by the immigrant illustrator Rudolph Dirks. It is the oldest comic strip that is still published today.


(E?) (L?) Http://kingfeatures.com/2014/12/king-of-the-comics-william-randolph-hearst-and-100-years-of-king-features-exhibit/

...
Among the many King creations included in this exhibition will be: "The Katzenjammer Kids", "Happy Hooligan", "Little Jimmy", "Bringing Up Father", "Krazy Kat", "Polly and Her Pals", "Tillie the Toiler "," Popeye "," Blondie "," Barney Google and Snuffy Smith "," Flash Gordon "," Mandrake the Magician "," The Little King "," Henry "," Prince Valiant "," Buz Sawyer "," Rip Kirby "," Beetle Bailey "," Dennis the Menace "," Juliet Jones "," Hi and Lois "," Family Circus "," The Lockhorns "," Hägar the Horrible "," Zippy "," Marvin ", "Curtis", "Bizarro", "Baby Blues", "Mutts", "Rhymes with Orange", "Zits", "Tina's Groove and Dustin". In addition to original drawings by the artists, related materials, such as printed newspaper pages, photographs, correspondence, sales brochures, advertisements and merchandise, will dramatically demonstrate the impact that King Features has had on the evolution and success of newspaper comics.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.sammlerforen.net/showthread.php?t=12812

...
1884-1910

Although preforms of the comic strips were already widespread in Europe, they only reached their completion in the USA, namely in the newspaper war of the Hearst and Pulitzer corporations. From the beginning, the comic strips were determined more by commerce than by art.

Rudolph Dirk's "The Katzenjammer Kids" from 1897 is the first film to which all four features of the definition apply. He was also style-forming in that most of the following comics were comical up until 1910: Stories about children, but not just for children.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.schattenblick.de/infopool/bildkult/comic/bchi0003.html

BACKGROUND / 003: "Katzenjammer Kids" - the first "real" comic strip

"The Katzenjammer Kids"

The oldest comic series still to be published

The first comic series that appeared from December 1897 in the wake of "Yellow Kid" (see BACKGROUND / 002: "Yellow Kid", the first official comic figure) in the weekend supplements of American daily newspapers was called "The Katzenjammer Kids" and became Drawn by the German-born Rudolph Dirks. The series created on behalf of the newspaper tsar William Randolph Hearst based on the model of "Max and Moritz" was, like many others later, intended as a weapon in the Pulitzer-Hearst newspaper war. The Katzenjammer Kids appeared as a full-page picture story, with speech bubbles and the same staff. The "katzies", as they will soon also be called, are the real forefathers of today's modern comic strips.

Like most of the comic stories of the time, the Katzenjammer Kids played in the immigrant milieu, which was emphasized by the broken English spoken by all the actors ("Stand up and look me in the face!").
...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.toonopedia.com/katzen.htm

THE CAT JAMMER KIDS
Original medium: Newspaper comics
Distributed by: King Features Syndicate
First Appeared: 1897
Creator: Rudolph Dirks

Many comics historians consider The Katzenjammer Kids, by Rudolph Dirks, and not Richard Outcault's The Yellow Kid, the first true newspaper comic strip
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(E?) (L?) Https://www.uni-oldenburg.de/geschichte/studium-und-lehre/lehre/projektlehre/erinnerung-im-comic/1895-1929/1895-1929/

1895 - 1929: The beginnings of comics and its establishment in society
...
Another series that participates in the transition from individual images and caricatures to the connection of several individual images is the series “The Katzenjammer Kids” by the German draftsman Rudolph Dirks, first published in 1897. Wilhelm Busch provided the template for this with “Max and Moritz”. Not only the figures and the arrangement as a picture story alone were formative, but also the elements of malicious pleasure and the conflict between moral ideas and the individual instinctual life.
...


(E?) (L?) Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Katzenjammer_Kids

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After a series of legal battles between 1912 and 1914, Dirks left the Hearst organization and began a new strip, first titled "Hans and Fritz" and then "The Captain and the Kids". It featured the same characters seen in "The Katzenjammer Kids", which was continued by Knerr. The two separate versions of the strip competed with each other until 1979, when The "Captain and the Kids" ended its six-decade run. "The Katzenjammer Kids" is still distributed by King Features, making it the oldest comic strip still in syndication and the longest running ever.
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(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Katzenjammer Kids
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Katzenjammer Kids" appears in literature around 1900.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordmap.co/#Katzenjammer Kids

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Created: 2016-04

Crypto (W3)

"Krypto" the dog and the right hand of Superboy, also comes from the planet Krypton.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?serie=1134
Krypto the Super Dog (USA 2004)

(E?) (L?) Http://www.toonopedia.com/krypto.htm
Krypto the Superdog

(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=8&content=Krypto
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Crypto" appears in the literature around the year 1800.

Created: 2011-11

L.

loc.gov
Monstrous Craws and Character Flaws
Masterpieces of cartoon and caricature at the Library of Congress

(E?) (L?) Http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/craws/

All objects in this exhibition, unless otherwise noted, are preserved in the Prints and Photographs Division. This exhibition was prepared with support from the Caroline and Erwin Swann Memorial Fund for Caricature and Cartoon.

An exhibition in the Swann Gallery of Caricature and Cartoon at the Library of Congress, February 25 - July 6, 1998.

For centuries great graphic artists have created enduring images that demonstrate the power of art as a vehicle for social and political commentary. Caricatures and cartoons are among the most lasting and effective of these images. These drawings, often depicting principal events and figures of the day, become in the hands of a master at once topical and timeless, unique and universal. Usually created under short deadlines for reproduction in a commercial format such as a newspaper or magazine, cartoons and caricatures reflect the artists' attempts to enlighten, amuse, provoke, or persuade their readers. In the effort to express themselves and engage their audience, these artists have produced original works of extraordinary historical and artistic value, shedding vivid light on their times, and, in retrospect, our own.


(E?) (L?) Http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/hbgift/

Herblock's Gift: Selections from the Herb Block Foundation Collection

The Library of Congress has recently acquired by gift the entire personal archives of editorial cartoonist Herbert L. Block, better known to the world as "Herblock." Editorial cartoons are a vital form of political commentary, representing the freedom of expression inherent in American democracy, and the Library of Congress is proud to maintain one of the world's premier programs in the study and preservation of cartoon art.
...


Created: 2016-04

M.

Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse (W3)

(E?) (L?) Http://www.characterproducts.com/info/character_histories/mickey_minnie_doorway.htm
Mickey Mouse History And A Little About Minnie Mouse
...
It was on this train ride back to Los Angeles from New York City that Walt Disney created Mickey Mouse. He knew he had to come up with a new character and created a mouse. (It is interesting to note that this mouse looked quite similar to Oswald the Rabbit. The main differences being Mickey Mouse had short round ears instead of long bunny ears, a longer nose, a long skinny mouse tail instead of a bunny tail, and skinnier legs and arms. The face, eyes, mouth and hairline were very similar.) Walt wanted to name the mouse character "Mortimer", but his wife, Lilly, didn't like that name and suggested "Mickey Mouse".

"Mickey Mouse" made his debut to the general public in a film named "Steamboat Willie" on November 19, 1928, at the Colony Theater in New York. This film also features the first appearance of "Minnie Mouse", as well as the world’s first use of fully synchronized sound in cartoons. "Mickey" and "Minnie" were instant hits. In fact, Mickey Mouse was so popular that over a million children joined the original Mickey Mouse Club between 1929 and 1932. The "Mickey Mouse Club" later became a popular children's television series that aired on ABC from 1955 to 1959. The show featured talented kids called Mouseketeers who sang, danced, performed skits, and introduced special guests and Disney cartoons.

Other interesting Mickey Mouse historical tidbits:
  • The original voice of Mickey Mouse was Walt Disney.
  • A special Academy Award was given to Walt Disney for the creation of Mickey Mouse in 1932.
  • The first Mickey Mouse cartoon in color was "The Band Concert" in 1935.
  • Mickey Mouse’s favorite sayings were "Oh boy!", "That sure is swell!", "Gosh!", "Aw, gee", and "See ya soon!".
...

"Erika Fuchs" the inventor of "piff", "paff", "puff" and "sigh"
"Mickey Mouse appeared for the first time in Germany in 1951. Erika Fuchs, who had a doctorate in art historian, then 44 years old, was found to translate the American stories. For twenty years she translated all Disney comics into German, later only the Barks stories. Hers Language has shaped and influenced generations. "


mickey mouse (W3)

(E1) (L1) http://www.wordsmith.org/awad
mickey mouse Mar 00
  • 1. Unimportant; trivial. Irritatingly petty.
  • 2. Intellectually unchallenging; simple
  • 3. Blandly sentimental. Used of popular compositions and performers. Relating to a soundtrack that accompanies the action in an unsubtle, melodramatic way suggestive of music written for animated films.
After the cartoon character Mickey Mouse, created by Walt Disney.

mickey mouse program (W3)

(E3) (L1) http://www.jargon.net/jargonfile/
North American equivalent of a noddy (that is, trivial) program. Doesn't necessarily have the belittling connotations of mainstream slang "Oh, that's just mickey mouse stuff!"; sometimes trivial programs can be very useful.

N

Ninth kind, ninth kind

(E?) (L?) Http://www.ninthart.com/
The art of comics is called "Ninth Art". Here you can find information about this medium.

O

on the fritz (W3)

The origin of the American expression "on the fritz" (Aug. 25, 1900?) (Also: "on the friz", "on de fritz") (English "on the blink") = German "kaputt" (eg Machines or systems) has not yet been clarified. There is also a note that Engl. "on the fritz" originally meant engl. "worthless", "poor quality" and only then the meaning of engl. "malfunctioning" assumed.

The following explanations can be found:
  • The "Oxford Dictionary" refers to the first occurrence in 1902. At that time, however, "on the fritz" still generally referred to a description of the condition.
  • One interpretation brings "friz" with the dialect form for Engl. "freeze" (1876) together, apparently with the meaning of engl. "to intimidate" = German "intimidate", "to snub" = German "snub", "push off the head".
  • The American poet and etymologist John Ciardi suspects a connection with poor electrical connections that cause a "pinch".
  • The American name for a German soldier, "Fritz", is also given.
  • The "Morris Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins" suspects a connection to the comic characters "Hans and Fritz" in the comic strip "The Katzenjammer Kids" (who are said to be inspired by "Max and Moritz"). The two made a name for themselves by causing a lot of trouble.


On the CD "1712 Overture and Other Musical Assaults" by P. D. Q. Bach you can also find a title "Prelude to Einstein on the Fritz".

In August 2014 Stephen Goranson posted a small overview on the American Dialect Society's mailing list:

  • 1880 "married or 'fritz to' the dark eyed senoritas"
  • 1886 "a friz nose"
  • 1891 "Fort'nate they [hands] friz to the oars"
  • [1892 "Jimmy the Bunco" schemes to get a Thanksgiving dinner; the lemonade comes with "friz". "I dunno as I cares on the friz"]
  • 1897 "friz up all de creeks"
  • 1901 "getting t 'be on de Fritz"
  • 1901 "For everything 't was frizable, that year was friz."
  • 1902 (source?) "Would Santa Claus be on the fritz / if we never had snow?" [Ironic effect of lack of ice?]
  • 1904 Life in Sing Sing. "Fritzer. Not good."
  • 1905 "He's on the friz." [Baseball player slump.]
  • 1905 "business goes on the fritz."
  • 1905 "good manners done friz up"
  • 1905 four wagons "all to de fritz"
  • 1906 "is he straight, or is he on de fritz?"
  • 1908 "Deep breathing is the thing for you if you are on the friz."
  • 1908 poem, "friz" rhyming with "wits."
  • 1908 Munsey's "our fat leading lady was on the friz"
  • 1909 "show is on de fritz"
  • 1912 "A poor man is friz out these days. Friz out, I say."
  • 1912 "All the religion 'll be friz out of this c'mmunity."
  • 1912 "I may talk on de fritz" [but won spelling bees]



(E?) (L?) Http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2014-September/subject.html

freeze, on the friz, on the fritz - and Santa 1902 Stephen Goranson


(E?) (L?) Http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2014-August/subject.html

  • * correction * RE: on the fritz - on the friz Stephen Goranson
  • freeze, on the friz, on the fritz - and Santa 1902 Stephen Goranson
  • freeze, on the friz, on the fritz - and Santa 1902 Jonathan Lighter
  • on the fritz - on the friz Stephen Goranson
  • on the fritz - on the friz Stephen Goranson
  • on the fritz - on the friz Stephen Goranson
  • on the fritz - on the friz Laurence Horn
  • on the fritz and friz - two spellings, and two pronunciations Stephen Goranson



(E?) (L?) Http://listserv.linguistlist.org/pipermail/ads-l/2010-July/subject.html

  • "on the Fritz" Stephen Goranson
  • "on the Fritz" Victor Steinbok
  • "on the Fritz" Baker, John M.
  • "on the Fritz" Douglas G. Wilson



(E?) (L?) Http://www.owad.de/owad-archive-quiz.php4?id=1768


(E?) (L?) Http://www.owad.de/check.php4?id=1768

...
WORD ORIGIN

On the fritz is an American expression that describes when something is broken or has ceased to work properly. The British equivalent is "on the blink". The phrase has been the subject of discussion in etymology circles for years. Nevertheless, there is no agreement regarding its origin.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://dictionary.reference.com/search?q=on the fritz

on the fritz


(E?) (L?) Https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1712_Overture_and_Other_Musical_Assaults

...
"Prelude to Einstein on the Fritz", p. E = mt² (P.D.Q. Bach) (6:37)
(A parody on the title of the opera Einstein on the Beach by Philip Glass and of Glass's music in general.)
...


(E1) (L1) http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-ont4.htm

On the fritz


(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=on the fritz
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "On the fritz" appears in literature around 1900.

(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordmap.co/#on the fritz

This experiment brings together the power of Google Translate and the collective knowledge of Wikipedia to put into context the relationship between language and geographical space.


Created: 2016-04

P.

Q

R.

S.

Scrooge McDuck, Uncle Scrooge, scrooge, Dagobert Duck, Dagobert (W3)

(E?) (L?) Http://www.hinternet.de/comic/e/entenwho.php

...
We're talking about none other than Donald's uncle "Scrooge McDuck", who made his first appearance in 1947 in this duck persiflage on Charles Dickens "A Christmas Carol" by Carl Barks and only recognized the meaning of Christmas after a lengthy purification and finally accepted it wonderful party.

Originally "Scrooge McDuck" was only supposed to appear in this story, but the stingy old sack, known in this country as "Dagobert Duck", became a crowd favorite. These days he can look back on his fiftieth anniversary in the duck cosmos.
...


In English he is still aptly called "Scrooge McDuck" = "stingy duck", later "Uncle Scrooge".

Why he was given the neutral name "Dagobert Duck" in German is not clear.

Since the German translators were known for their allusions, it can be assumed that the name "Dagobert" was chosen deliberately because of its meaning, which is composed of kelt.-gall.-germ. "daga" = "good", "very" and ahd. "beraht" = "brilliant". It originally meant "the very famous one". In a figurative sense, one can also see the "very (gold) shiny" = "rich" in "Dagobert".

The term "Scrooge" = "Geizhals" goes back to the character "Ebenezer Scrooge" in Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol".

(E1) (L1) http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=scrooge


(E?) (L?) Http://dictionary.reference.com/


(E1) (L1) http://www.takeourword.com/et_q-s.html


(E?) (L?) Http://wordcraft.infopop.cc/eponyms.htm


(E?) (L?) Http://www.wordsmith.org/awad/archives/0596


(E?) (L?) Http://projekt.gutenberg.de/autoren/dickens.htm


(E?) (L?) Http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/dickens/weihlied/weihlied.htm


(E?) (L?) Http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/dickens/weihlied/weihl001.htm

...
Oh, he was a real bloodsucker, that Scrooge! A greedy, scraping together, clinging, stingy old sinner: hard and sharp as a pebble from which no steel has yet struck a warm spark, closed and self-sufficient and all to himself, like an oyster. The cold in his heart stiffened his old features, his pointed nose sharper, his face wrinkled, his gait stiff, his eyes red, his thin lips blue, and it sounded in his rasping voice. A frosty hoop lay on his head, on his eyebrows, on his thick, shaggy beard. He always dragged his own low temperature around with him: in the dog days he cooled his office as if with ice, at Christmas time he didn't make it a degree cozier. ...


(E?) (L?) Http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2003/12/24/do2401.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2003/12/24/ ixopinion.html

Scrooge's seasonal guide to making your money go further


Under this heading is an article that offers advice on how to get the most bang for your buck. Under "Scrooge's Book of the Year" one finds e.g. the reference to being the cheapest book of the year, "measured by the cost per page" (Franklin Delano Roosevelt: Champion of Freedom).

stella anatium (W3)

In "Barks' Animal Life" the "biodiversity in Duckburg" (in the state "Calisota") is lexically recorded. It is a collection of organic and word creations from Donald's world, the place of residence of the "anatids" = "duck-shaped" lat. "Stella anatium" = "duck star".

(E?) (L1) http://www.quakpiep.de/Barks'%20Thierleben.pdf


T

toon - Toonopedia
Cartoon glossary
Cartoon characters encyclopedia

(E3) (L1) http://www.toonopedia.com/
"Toonopedia" can no longer be reached.


A "toon" is a "cartoon" or "cartoon character" - "cartoon" referring not just to the animated kind, but also to such "still cartoons" as comic books, newspaper strips, magazine cartoons, etc.


(E?) (L1) http://www.toonopedia.com/glossary.htm

Glossary Of Specialized Words and Phrases Used in Don Markstein’s Toonopedia ™

Animé • Bigfoot • Big Little Book • Cartoonist • Cel • Cel Washer • Comix • Crossover • Cycle • Digest • Direct Market Distribution • Extreme • Fanboy • Fanzine • Frame • Funny Animal • Graphic Novel • In-Between • In-Betweener • Indicia • Inker • Letterer • Manga • Mini Comics • Mint • Model Sheet • Mutant • Painter • Panel • Penciller • Reboot • Retcon • Rotoscope • Sequential Art • Splash Panel • Storyboard • Sunday Page • Superhero • Tabloid • Topper • Universe • Word Balloon


(E?) (L?) Http://www.toonopedia.com/

  • The "Alice" Comedies | A-Man | A. Mutt | A. Piker Clerk | Aaahh! Real Monsters | Abbie and Slats | Abie the Agent | Adam Strange | Adam Warlock | The Addams Family (1937) | The Addams Family (1973) | The Adventures of Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck | The Adventures of Patsy | Adventures on Other Worlds | Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. | Aggie Mack | The Air Raiders | Air Wave (1942) | Air Wave (1978) | Airboy | Akbar and Jeff | Alfred E. Neuman | Alias ​​The Spider | Alice in Wonderland | The All Winners Squad | The All-Star Squadron | Alley Oop | Ally Sloper | Alpha Flight | Alphonse and Gaston | Alvin and the Chipmunks | The Amazing Chan and the Chan Clan | Amazing-Man | Ambush Bug | The American | American Flagg! | American Splendor | An American Tail | Americommando | Amethyst, Princess of Gemworld | And Her Name Was Maud | Andy Capp | Andy Gump | Andy Panda | The Angel (1939) | The Angel (1963) | Angel and the Ape | The Angriest Dog in the World | Animal Man | Annie | Answer Man | The Ant and the Aardvark | Ant Man | Antediluvian Ancestors | Anthro | The Apache Kid | Apartment 3-G | Apple Mary | Aquaman | The Arabian Knights | Arak, Son of Thunder | Archangel | Archie | archy and mehitabel | Arlo and Janis | Around the Block with Dunc and Loo | The Arrow | The Atom (1940) | The Atom (1961) | Atom ant | The Atomic Knights | Atomic Mouse | Atomic Sub | Atomictot | Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy | Autocat and Motormouse | Automaton | The Avenger | The Avengers | Avengers West Coast
  • B'Wana Beast | B.C.
  • Cairo Jones | Calvin and Hobbes | Calvin and the Colonel | Candy | Cannon | Canyon Kiddies | Cap Stubbs and Tippie | Cap'n Crunch | Captain America | The Captain and the Kids | Captain Atom (1960) | Captain Atom (1986) | Captain Britain | Captain Canuck | Captain Carrot and His Amazing Zoo Crew | Captain Caveman | Captain Comet | Captain Compass | Captain Easy | Captain Fathom | Captain Flag | Captain Flash | Captain Freedom | Captain Klutz | Captain Marvel (1940) | Captain Marvel (1966) | Captain Marvel (1967) | Captain Marvel (1982) | Captain Marvel Bunny | Captain Marvel Jr. | Captain Planet and the Planeteers | Captain Pureheart | Captain Savage and His Leatherneck (or Battlefield) Raiders | Captain Storm | Captain Tootsie | Captain Triumph | Captain Universe | Captain Victory and the Galactic Rangers | Care Bears | Carmen Sandiego | Casey Ruggles | Caspar Milquetoast | Casper the Friendly Ghost | The Cat | The Cat in the Hat | Cat-man and Kitten | Cathy | The Cattanooga Cats | The Catwoman | Cave Carson | Cave Kids | Cerebus the Aardvark | Challengers of the Unknown | The Champions | Charlie Brown | Cheech Wizard | Chilly Willy | Ching Chow | Chip 'n Dale Rescue Rangers | Chip'n'Dale | The Chipmunks | Chocula | Chris KL-99 | Cinderella | Circus Solly | Claire Voyant | Clara Cluck | Classics Illustrated | Claude Cat | The Claw | Clifford the Big Red Dog | Clint Clobber | Cloak and Dagger | The Clock | The Close Shaves of Pauline Peril | Clutch Cargo | Clyde Crashcup | Col. Heeza Liar | The Colossus | The Comet | Comics Revue | Commander Battle and the Atomic Sub | Commander McBragg | Commander Steel | Commando Yank | Conchy | Concrete | Congo Bill | Congorilla | Connie | Constantine | Cool Cat | Cool McCool | Cosmo Cat | | Count Chocula | Count Duckula | Count Screwloose of Tooloose | Courageous Cat and Minute Mouse | Coyote | Crankshaft | Crazylegs Crane | The Creeper | Crime Does Not Pay | Crime Smasher | Crimebuster | The Crimson Avenger | Crock | The Crow | Crusader | Crusader Rabbit | The Crypt of Terror | Crystar | Cubby Bear | Curious George | Curly Kayoe | Curtis | Cyclops | El Castigo
  • Daffy Duck | Dagar the Invincible | Dagar, Desert Hawk | Dagwood and Blondie | Daimon Hellstrom, Son of Satan | Damage Control | Dan Dunn | Danger Mouse | Daredevil (1940) | Daredevil (1964) | Daria | Darkwing Duck | The Dart | Dastardly and Muttley in Their Flying Machines | Dauntless Durham of the U.S.A.| Davey and Goliath | Dazzler | Deadman | The Death Patrol | Deathlok the Demolisher | The Defenders | Defenders of the Earth | The Demon | Dennis the Menace (U.K.) | Dennis the Menace (U.S.) | Deputy Dawg | The Desert Peach | Desperate Desmond | The Destroyer | Destroyer Duck | Devil Dinosaur | Dewey, Huey and Louie | Dexter's Laboratory | Dial H for Hero (1966) | Dial H for Hero (1981) | Dick and Larry | Dick Cole, The Wonder Boy | Dick Dastardly | Dick Tracy | Dick's Adventures in Dreamland | Dickie Dare | Dilbert | The Dingbat Family | Dinglehoofer and His Dog | Dinky Duck | Dino Boy in the Lost Valley | Dinosaur Hunter | Dinosaur Island | Dirty Duck | Disco Dazzler | Dixie Dugan | DNAgents | Doc Strange | Doc Yak | | Doctor Droom | Doctor Druid | Doctor Fate | Doctor Mid-Nite | Doctor Occult | Doctor Solar, Man of the Atom | Doctor Spector | Doctor Strange | Doctor Thirteen | The Dodo and the Frog | DoDo the Kid from Outer Space | Doll Man | Don Winslow of the Navy | Donald Duck | Donald Duck's nephews | Dondi | Doonesbury | Dopey | Dotty Dripple | The Double Life of Private Strong | Doug | The Dove | Dover and Clover | Dr. Atomic | Dr. Fate | Dr. Mid-Nite | Dr. Mystic | Dr. Occult | Dr. Strange | Dr. Thirteen | Dracula (1966) | Dracula (1972) | Drago | The Drak Pack | Dreams of the Rarebit Fiend | Dredd | Droopy | Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century | Duckman | DuckTales | Duckula | Dudley Do-Right of the Mounties | Dumb Dora | Dumbo | Dunc and Loo | Dynamo | Dynomutt
  • E-Man | Earthworm Jim | Easy Co. | Eclipso | Eek and Meek | Eek! the Cat | Egghead | Elektra | Elfquest | Ella Cinders | Elmer Fudd | Elmyra Duff | Elongated Man | Emmy Lou | Enemy Ace | Ernie | The Escapades of Mr. Jack | Etrigan the Demon | Etta Kett | Everett True | Evil Ernie | Extreme Ghostbusters | The Eye Sees
  • | Freckles and His Friends | Fred Basset | The Freedom Fighters | Friday Foster | Frightenstein | The Frito Bandito | Fritz the Cat | Fritzi Ritz | Frosty the Snowman | Fruitman | The Funky Phantom | Funky Winkerbean | Funnyman
  • G.I. Joe | G.I.
  • Hagar the Horrible | Hairbreadth Harry | Half Hitch | Hamton Pig | The Hangman | Hap Hopper | Happy Hooligan | The Harlem Globetrotters | Harold Teen | Hashimoto-san | The Hawk and the Dove | Hawkeye | Hawkman (1939) | Hawkman (1961) | Hayfoot Henry | Hazel | He-Man and the Masters of the Universe | The Heap | The Heart of Juliet Jones | Heathcliff | Heckle and Jeckle | Hector Heathcote | Hee Haw and Her Name Was Maud | Heeza Liar | Hejji | Light blazer | Hellboy | Hellcat | Hellspawn | Hellstorm | Henery Hawk | Henry | Herbie | Hercules ('60s animated) | The Herculoids | Here Comes the Grump | Herman and Katnip | Hero for Hire | Hex | Hi and Lois | Hillbilly Bears | Him | Hippety Hopper | His Name is ... Savage | Hogan's Alley | Hokey Wolf | Home, Sweet Home | Homer Pigeon | Homer the Happy Ghost | The Honey Mousers | | The Hooded Horseman | Hooded Justice | Hop Harrigan | Hoppity Hooper | Hoppy the Marvel Bunny | Horace Horsecollar | Horton the Elephant | Hot Stuff the Little Devil | Hourman | How the Grinch Stole Christmas | Howard the Duck | Hubert | Hubie and Bertie | Huckleberry Hound | Huey, Dewey and Louie | Hugh Hazzard and His Iron Man | The Hulk | The Human Bomb | The Human Dynamo | The Human Target | The Human Torch (1939) | The Human Torch (1961) | Humphrey Bear | Hunky and Spunky
  • Ibis the Invincible | Iceman | Impossible - But True | The Impossible Man | The Impossibles | Impulses | In the Land of Wonderful Dreams | Inch High, Private Eye | The Incredible Hulk | The Inferior Five | Infinity Inc. | Infinity Man | The Inhumans | Inki and the Minah Bird | Inside Earth | The Inspector | | Inspector Willoughby | The Invaders | The Invisible Hood | Invisible Scarlet O'Neil | Invisible Woman | The Iron Ace | Iron Fist | Iron Man | Irving Forbush | | It's a Girl's Life | It's Only a Game | It's the wolf | It, the Living Colossus
  • J'onn J'onzz, Manhunter from Mars | Jabberjaw | Jackie Jokers | The Jackson Twins | Jacky's Diary | The Jaguar | Jane | Jean Gray | Jem and the Holograms | Jerry on the job | The Jester | Jet Powers | The Jetsons | Jetta of the 21st Century | Jiggs and Maggie | Jigsaw | Jim Hardy | Jiminy Cricket | Jimminy and the Magic Book | Jimmy | Yo-yo, Congo King | Joe and Asbestos | Joe Jinks | Joe Palooka | Joe Quince | Joe's Car | John Constantine | John Darling | John Force, Magic Agent | Johnny Cloud, Navajo Ace | Johnny Dynamite | Johnny Hazard | Johnny Quick | Johnny Thunder (1939) | Johnny Thunder (1948) | The Joker | Jon Sable, Freelance | Jonah Hex | Jonny Quest | José Carioca | Josie and the Pussycats | Jot | Judge Dredd | Judge Parker | Judge Puffle | Judge Rummy's Court | Judo Master | Juliet Jones | Julius the Cat | The Jungle Book | Jungle Jim | The Jungle Twins | The Junior Woodchucks | Just Kids | The Justice League of America | The Justice Society of America
  • K the Unknown | Ka-tsar | Kaanga, Lord of the Jungle | Kamandi, the Last Boy on Earth | Katie Ka-Boom | Katy Keene | | Keeping Up with the Joneses | Kerry Drake | Kevin and Kell | Kevin the Bold | Kewpies | Kid Colt, Outlaw | Kid Eternity | Kid Flash (1960) | Kid Flash (2003) | Kid Power | Killraven | The King | The King and Odie | King Aroo | King Kong | King Leonardo and His Short Subjects | King of the Royal Mounted | Kissyfur | | Knights of the Galaxy | Cobra | Koko the Clown | Kona, Monarch of Monster Isle | Konga | Krazy Kat | | Kudzu | Kwicky Koala | Lyonel Feininger
  • Cartoons
  • 'Mazing Man | MARS. Patrol | M.A.S.K. Frog | Mickey Finn | Mickey Mouse | Mickey Council | Midnight | The Mighty Crusaders | The Mighty Hercules | The Mighty Heroes | The Mighty Mightor | Mighty Mouse | Mighty Samson | The Mighty Thor | Mike and Ike (They Look Alike) | Mike Nomad | Millie the Lovable Monster | Millie the Model | Milton the Monster | Minimidget | The Minute and a Half Man | Minute Movies | Miracleman | Miss America | Miss Cairo Jones | Miss Fury | Miss Lace | Miss Masque | Miss Peach | Mister Breger | Mister Machine | Mister Miracle | Misterjaw | Misty | Mlle. Marie | Moby Dick | Moby Duck | Modesty Blaise | Molly Moo Cow | Momma | Monty | Moon Girl | Moon Knight | Moon Mullins | Moose and Molly | Moose Miller | Mopsy | Morbius, the Living Vampire | Morty Meekle | Mother Goose and Grimm | Motormouse and Autocat | Mouse Musketeers | Mr. Abernathy | Mr. America | Mr. and Mrs. J. Evil Scientist | Mr. Fantastic | Mr. Jack | Mr. Justice | Mr. Magoo | Mr. Monopoly | Mr. Monster | Mr. Muscles | Mr. Mystic | Mr. Natural | Mr. Obadiah Oldbuck | Mr. Satan | Mr. Scarlet and Pinky | Mr. Terrific | Mr. Twee Deedle | Ms. Marvel | Ms. Mystic | Ms. Peach | Ms. Tree | Mushmouse and Punkin Puss | Mutt and Jeff | My Little Pony | Myra North, Special Nurse | Myrtle | The Mystery Men | the Marksman
  • Namora | Nancy | Nature Boy | Naza, Stone Age Warrior | The Nebbs | Neil the Horse | Nelvana of the Northern Lights | Nemesis | Nervous Rex | New Gods | The New Mutants | New Teen Titans | The Newlyweds | The Newsboy Legion | Nexus | Nibsy the Newsboy in Funny Fairyland | Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. | Night Force | Night Nurse | Night Rider | The Nighthawk | The Nightmare Before Christmas | Nightveil | Nightwing | NoMan | Norb | Not Brand Echh | Nov shmoz ka pop? | Nova | Nukla | Nutsy Squirrel | Nyoka the Jungle Girl
  • | O.G. Wotasnozzle | Oaky Doaks | Obadiah Oldbuck | The Occult Files of Doctor Spektor | The Oddball Couple | | Oil Can Harry | Old Doc Yak | Old Judge Rumhauser | Omega the Unknown | On Stage | On the Wing | One Froggy Evening | One Million Years Ago | Oona Goosepimple | Oracle | Original Ghostbusters | Orson's Farm | Oswald the Lucky Rabbit | Our Antediluvian Ancestors | Our Boarding House | Our Hero's Hairbreadth Escapes | Out of the Inkwell | Out Our Way | The Outbursts of Everett True | Outland | The Owl
  • Q.T. Hush | Quack Pack | Quackula | Quick Draw McGraw | Quicksilver (1940) | Quicksilver (1964) | Quincy
  • "Red" | Raccoon Kids | Raggedy Ann and Andy | Rags Rabbit | Rainbow Brite | Ralph Phillips | Ralph Wolf and Sam Sheepdog | Rapid Rabbit | Rapping Around | The Rarebit Fiend | The Raven | The Rawhide Kid | The Ray | Reagan's Raiders | Real Ghostbusters | Red Barry | Red Devil | Red Raven | Red Rube | Red Ryder | Red Sonja | The Red Tornado (1940) | The Red Tornado (1968) | Red, White and Blue | Reddy kilowatts | Redeye | Redmask | Reg'lar Fellers | Ren and Stimpy | Rescue Rangers | Rex Morgan, M.D. | Rex the Wonder Dog | Rich Uncle Pennybags | Richie Rich | Rick O'Shay | Ricochet Rabbit | Right Around Home | The Ringo Kid | Rio Rita | Rip Hunter, Time Master | Rip Kirby | Ripley's Believe It or Not | Road Runner | Robin the Boy Wonder | Robotman (1942) | Robotman (1963) | Robotman (1984) | Rocket Robin Hood | The Rocketeer | Rocky and Bullwinkle | Rocky Stoneaxe | Roger Rabbit | Roger Ramjet | The Roman Holidays | romance comics | Room and Board | Royal Roy | Rube Goldberg Devices | Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer | Ruff and Reddy | Rugrats | Rulah, Jungle Goddess | Rusty Riley
  • 711 | S.H.I.E.L.D. | Sable | Sabrina the Teenage Witch | Sad sack | The Saga of Crystar | Salesman Sam | Sally Forth (1971) | Sally Forth (1982) | Sally the Sleuth | Sam and Silo | Sam Hill, Private Eye | Sam Sheepdog and Ralph Wolf | Sam's Strip | Samson | Samson and Goliath | The Sandman (1939) | The Sandman (1974) | The Sandman (1989) | Santa Claus | Sargon the Sorcerer | Satana | Savage Dragon | The Savage She-Hulk | Scamp | Scarlet O'Neil | The Scarlet Scorpion | The Scarlet Witch | School Days | Scooby-Doo | Scooter | Scorchy Smith | Scrappy | Screen Songs | Screwy Squirrel | Scribbly the Boy cartoonist | Scrooge McDuck | Sea Devils | Secret Agent Corrigan | Secret Agent X-9 | The Secret Society of Super-Villains | Secret Squirrel | Señorita Rio | The Sensational She-Hulk | Sentinels of Liberty | The Seven Soldiers of Victory | Sgt. Boyle | Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos | Sgt. Rock | Sgt. Spook | Shade, the Changing Man | Shang-Chi, Master of Kung Fu | Shazzan | She's Josie | She-Hulk | Sheena, Queen of the Jungle | Sherlocko the Monk | Sherman and Peabody | Sherman's Lagoon | The Shield (1939) | The Shield (1959) | Shinbone Alley | The Shining Knight | Shock Gibson | Shoe | Short ribs | Show Girl | Sick Sick Sick | Sidney the Elephant | Silk Hat Harry's Divorce Suit | Silly Seal | Silly Sidney | Silly Symphonies | The Silver Streak | The Silver Surfer | Silverhawks | Simon, Theodore and Alvin | The Simpsons | Sin City | Sinbad Jr. Spy | Spyman | The Squadron Supreme | Squiddly Diddly | The Squirrel Cage | Stanley and His Monster | Star Hawkins | Star Hawks | The Star-Spangled Kid and Stripesy | Starman (1941) | Starman (1980) | Starman (1988) | Starman (1994) | Starslayer | Static | Steel (1993) | Steel Sterling | Steel, the Indestructible Man (1978) | Steve Canyon | Steve Roper | Steven Spielberg Presents Tiny Toon Adventures | Stop that pigeon! | Strawberry Shortcake | Strikeforce Morituri | Strongheart | Stumbo the Giant | The Sub-Mariner | Sugar and Spike | Sun Girl | Super Brat | Super Chicken | Super Duck | The Super Friends | The Super Globetrotters | Super Goof | Super Heroes | Super President | Super Rabbit | Super hip | Superboy | Supergirl | Superman | Supermouse | Supermuse | Supernatural Law | Supersnipe | Susie Q. Smith | Swamp Thing | Swing with Scooter | Sylvester Pussycat | the small society
  • T-Man | T.H.U.N.D.E.R.
  • U.N.D.E.R.S.E.A. Agent | U.S. Acres | Ultra the Multi-Alien | Ultra-Man | Uncle Pennybags | Uncle Remus | Uncle Sam (Quality Comics) | Uncle Sam (traditional) | Uncle Scrooge | Underdog | Up Front | The Upside-Downs | Usagi Yojimbo
  • V for Vendetta | Vampirella | The Vault of Horror | Venus | Victory through Air Power | Vigilante (1941) | Vigilante (1983) | Viking Prince | The Vision (1940) | The Vision (1968)
  • Wacky Races | Wacky Witch | Wally Gator | Wally the Wizard | Wambi the Jungle Boy | War of the Worlds | The War that Time Forgot | Warbird | Warlock | The Warlord | The Warner Brothers (and Sister) | Wash Tubbs | The Wasp | The Watcher | Watchmen | The Web | Wee Pals | Wendy the Good Little Witch | Werewolf (1966) | Werewolf by Night | West Coast Avengers | Wheelie and the Chopper Bunch | Where in the World Is Carmen Sandiego? | Where's Huddles? | The Whip | White Indian | Whiteboy | The Whizzer | Who Framed Roger Rabbit | | Wiggles the Wonderworm | Wildcat | Wildfire | Wile E. Coyote | Willie and Joe | Willie Whopper | Willoughby | Winky Dink and You | Winnie the Pooh | Winnie Winkle | Winsome Witch | Winthrop | Witchblade | The Wizard | The Wizard of Id | Wolff and Byrd: Counselors of the Macabre | Wolverine | The Woman in Red | Wonder Man (1939) | Wonder Man (1964) | Wonder Warthog | Wonderworm | Woodsy Owl | Woody Woodpecker | The World of Commander McBragg | The Wuzzles | The Wyoming Kid
  • X-9 | X-Factor | The X-Men | Xenozoic Tales
  • The Yellow Claw | Yellow Jacket | The Yellow Kid | Yellow Submarine | Yogi Bear | Yosemite Sam | The Young Allies | Young Buffalo Bill | Young King Cole | Young Romance | Young Samson
  • Zambini the Miracle Man | Zanzibar the Magician | Zatanna the Magician | Zatara the Magician | Ziggy | Ziggy Pig and Silly Seal | Zippy the Pinhead | Zoo Crew | Zot!



toonpool (W3)

The Internet address "toonpool" stands for "cartoon pool" = "cartoon collection".

(E?) (L?) Http://www.toonpool.com/

Categories: Religion (209) | Politics (1303) | Media & Culture (1589) | Love & Sex (723) | Business (405) | Famous People (507) | Philosophy (996) | Education & Tech (306) | Sports (305)


U

V.

W.

Wonder Woman (W3)

As Engl. "Wonder woman" is also called a woman who is successful as a wife, mother, housewife and professionally.

(E?) (L?) Http://comicsalliance.com/superman-safe-sex-campaign-india/

...
Exhibiting now a "Gallery Nature Morte" in New Delhi, India ias Put It On, Again !, featuring the works of Jiten Thukral & Sumir Tagra. The duo's art deals explicitly with serious themes of safe sex and the transmission of HIV through a fairly playful prism of bright colors, traditional Indian imagery and figures from popular culture - specifically, the superheroes of DC Comics, including Superman, Captain Marvel and Wonder Woman .
...


(E?) (L?) Http://hotword.dictionary.com/how-do-you-define-wonder-woman%E2%80%99s-costume-leotard-bikini-armor/

How do you define Wonder Woman’s costume? Bikini, armor, or what?

June 30, 2010

Diana Prince, better known as Wonder Woman, is a DC Comics superhero as "beautiful as Aphrodite, wise as Athena, stronger than Hercules, and swifter than Mercury." Today her iconic costume received a super duper makeover. Among the highlights: the addition of
CONTINUE READING »


(E?) (L?) Http://epguides.com/menuw/

Wonder Woman


(E?) (L?) Http://www.fernsehserien.de/index.php?abc=W

Wonder Woman (US 1974-1979)


(E?) (L?) Http://www.howstuffworks.com/big.htm

Wonder Woman's Dirty Secrets


(E?) (L?) Http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/arts/comic-books/wonder-woman.htm
Wonder Woman’s creator was a radical psychologist / inventor / attorney who had two wives with two children each, all living together as one family. With such a troubled upbringing, it's no wonder America’s favorite invisible jet pilot experienced so much turbulence in her six decades as a crimefighter. Learn all about her roots and how she changed through the years.

(E?) (L?) Http://entertainment.howstuffworks.com/arts/comic-books/wonder-woman1.htm

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William M. Marston created Wonder Woman back in 1941, but was also an attorney, a psychologist, an educational consultant and an inventor. Among other things, he can claim a leading role in the development of the polygraph lie detector and the systolic blood pressure test.
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(E?) (L?) Http://www.lettersofnote.com/2010/10/birth-of-wonder-woman.html

October 2010, 21st: The birth of Wonder Woman


(E?) (L?) Http://www.naturemorte.com/exhibitions/selected_work/delhi/past/190

Wonder Women (girl on lotus), 2011
Oil on canvas
72 x 48 x 2 inches (122 x 183 x 5 cms)


(E?) (L1) http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/nov/20/wonder-woman-weird-true-story/

Wonder Woman: The Weird, True Story
Sarah Kerr
...
On a literal level, too, Lepore has telling details to add to the feminist backstory of Wonder Woman. Officially, the comic (not a comic strip in a newspaper but a book following the serial adventures of a hero or in this case a heroine) was launched in 1941 by a man named William Moulton Marston. Marston, working under the name Charles Moulton, was without doubt the creator, but in practice he was assisted by his wife, Sadie Elizabeth Holloway Marston (sometimes called Sadie, sometimes Betty), and by a younger woman, Olive Byrne, who had lived with the married couple for years.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://darkmark6.tripod.com/wonderind.htm

The Earth-One Index: Wonder Woman


(E?) (L?) Http://www.uky.edu/Projects/Chemcomics/html/ww_21_cov.html

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Thanks to the popular 1970s television show starring Lynda Carter, Wonder Woman is the best-known comic-book superheroine. She, with Superman and Batman, is one of DC Comics' "Big Three."
...


(E1) (L1) http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?corpus=0&content=Wonder Woman
Query in the Google Corpus with 15Mio. scanned books from 1500 to today.

Engl. "Wonder Woman" appears in literature around 1910/1940.

Created: 2014-11

X

xkcd.com
A webcomic of romance, sarcasm, math, and language

(E?) (L?) Http://xkcd.com/


(E?) (L?) Http://xkcd.com/about/

...
What does XKCD stand for?

It's not actually an acronym.It's just a word with no phonetic pronunciation - a treasured and carefully-guarded point in the space of four-character strings.

Where did all this start?

I was going through old math / sketching graph paper notebooks and didn't want to lose some of the work in them, so I started scanning pages. I took the more comic-y ones and put them up on a server I was testing out, and got a bunch of readers when BoingBoing linked to me. I started drawing more seriously, gained a lot more readers, started selling t-shirts on the site, and am currently shipping t-shirts and drawing this comic full-time. It's immensely fun and I really appreciate y'all's support.
...


(E?) (L?) Http://xkcd.com/207/

What does XKCD mean?


(E?) (L?) Http://imgs.xkcd.com/comics/what_xkcd_means.png

What xkcd means


(E?) (L?) Http://xkcd.com/archive/

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